Tag Archives: raw

Kohlrabi… what?

This week we are talking about Kohlrabi.  By the end of this post my hope is that you are familiar with the vegetable enough to buy one and eat it!

To start with this is what a kohlrabi looks like.photo 1

Kohlrabi is part of the cabbage family.  There are three basic parts to this vegetable.  The leaves, outer skin, and inner parts.  The leaves and inner parts are eatable.  Treat the leaves as you would any cooking greens.  The inner parts are similar in texture to a radish or broccoli stems.  The taste is similar to broccoli stems, jicama, or maybe even a faint apple or potato.

According to the folks at the Natural Agricultural Library… kohlrabi is full of some good vitamins and minerals.

Our farmer friends from River to River Farm asked us to take a closer look at this vegetable this week and present some cooking options.  So, here goes!

Grilled
photo 2After some googling & asking around someone mentioned grilling the kohlrabi.  We have a weekly grilling night with some co-workers so we figured we’d give it a try!  We cut the kohlrabi into ~1/4 inch slices, brushed with olive oil, stuck them on skewers, and grilled for 10-15 min.  They were amazing!  We are definitely doing this again.

Raw
We often try foods raw first.  We sliced the kohlrabi up and put some salt, pepper, and olive oil on them,  They were good.  I see us putting small pieces in salad in the future.

Roasted
We love roasted veges.  Toss an assortment of vegetables in a baking pan with olive oil and let your 350 degree oven do its magic for about an hour.  With the kohlrabi, I’d cut them into 1/2 inch chunks.

Kohlrabi Curry
We have been on a big Indian food kick lately.  Preparing for some upcoming blogs posts…
I googled and found these two posts: Kohlrabi Curry & Kohlrabi Greens Curry – I knew we needed to try them both.  We followed the recipe’s (minus the pressure cooker – as we don’t have one yet) and found both to be a bit bland – but good.

Kohlrabi and feta quiche
Plan on trying this recipe next weekend.  Looks good to me!

So, those are some ways to use this great vegetable!  Who would have thought something that looks vaguely like an alien could taste so good!

What have your experiences been with the kohlrabi? How do you prepare it?

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Sugar Snap Peas

As spring slowly rolls into summer we start to see more than greens at the market!  This week I am excited to get some more sugar snap peas.  We have been enjoying these delicious pods all week.  Our peas, grown by Kris and Adriane of River to River Farm, are crisp and beautiful!

photo (5)This is what they looked like this week at the market.  Absolutely beautiful!

So, what to do with these?
One of the reasons I love sugar snap peas is that one can eat them raw or cooked.  We have been eating them raw more than cooked so far this season.  Most of the time, we just eat these by the handful – much as you might enjoy popcorn!  I should confess, we were watching a BBC show last night and snacked on raw sugar snap peas (we had a large bowl with the washed peas, and a bowl for the discarded tops & strings).

Peas & Mulberry Photo shoot-8696

Wether you are eating them raw or cooking them, it is important that you first wash your peas.  A quick run under cold water should do the trick.  Then you need to peel off the strings.  Typically we pinch the top (leafy) part of the pea, snap & peel the thin strings off.  To the left is a picture of a whole pea, a pea with the top snapped & partially peeled, and the pea to the right has had the strings removed & both ends snapped.  If the peas are less mature (smoother, flatter pods) they might not need their strings removed.  Some people also eat the strings, just figure out what works for you & do that!

Another way to eat snap peas is to saute them.  This can be done in a cast iron skillet with a little olive oil, wash & dry, take the strings off, and put them in the skillet for a few minutes, turning once.

Peas & Mulberry Photo shoot-8701Magdalen made some for herself to have with lunch the other day, they were super quick & easy (took less than 5 minutes) & delicious.  The pea pods were warm and they had a smoother, softer texture, with wonderful juicy pops when eating the warmed pea seeds.

Other folks steam their peas.  One word of warning, don’t overcook them!  They aren’t as yummy if you do!

Peas & Mulberry Photo shoot-8699

Here is a picture of three peas opened up so one can see the seeds:  As you can see, the one on the left is the most mature of the three, and the one all the way to the right is the least mature.  We like them when they’re right in the middle!  Happy picking!