Tag Archives: Strawberry

Salads!

Last week I highlighted some salad dressings, this week I’m talking about salads.

We’ve been enjoying lots of great fresh greens this spring from River to River farm.  Along with a variety of cooking greens, we are finding all sorts of new lettuce varieties to enjoy.  In particular, the Forellenschluss variety – a type of romaine- has been great!  We have heard of people using this lettuce for wraps.  We have also been introduced to the  Bronze Arrowhead variety.  This is a very light lettuce – we have put it on many a salad lately.

Speaking of salads, here are a few salad recipes we been enjoying over the past few weeks.  First, know that it is important to wash your lettuce.  If you get them from a market or the store (or even your own garden)- it is important to wash the leaves.  We take each leaf off one by one & place them in a salad spinner.  Add some cold water & stir the leaves with your hand.  Then use the strainer to clear out the water.  I do a second wash the same way.  Then use the spinner to spin the leaves dry.

Salad with seeds & nuts:
Base of lettuce
Toast some pumpkin seeds, pecans, & raisins in a dry fry pan for a few minutes to bring out the flavor (the raisins should puff up, they’ll deflate once they cool down).
Put some cilantro on top to add some depth of flavor.
Add a dressing of your choosing.  I recommend a simple balsamic vinegar/olive oil mixture.  But, I have also really enjoyed the Gaba Gaba dressing from the salad dressings post.

Salad with strawberries:
It is strawberry season here – we’ve found these are great on salads.
Pretty simple – clean the lettuce with the instructions above, wash & slice some strawberries.  Add the dressing of your choosing.

Salad with mango, avocado lime, cilantro, and paprika:
While the mangoes are not at all local… they are in season!
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We buy ours from a local international food store by the case during this season.  While we eat a great number of them, we also cut some up and freeze them for later when they won’t be in season.
However, for this salad – again a bed of lettuce, add some cilantro, mango chunks, avocado (we didn’t have any when we made it), and then sprinkle lime juice and paprika on top.  We also added some fresh ground salt & pepper to this salad.

To help you cut your mango – here is a quick tutorial.
Along the middle of the mango is a long seed/pit.  You will want to not cut through it.  Make two cuts along the long/narrow side of the mango.  With your two ‘halves’ – first cut a grid pattern like so:
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Then you flip the mango out and you get these funny looking nub-spikes!
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Easy to cut off into chunks.  Get the rest of the meat off of the middle piece of the mango (the part surrounding the pit).  As a reminder, mango skin is not good for humans to eat.

What salads have you been making lately? Any favorite recipes? 

Strawberry Rhubarb Sorbet (photo + recipe)

Last summer my partner purchased a Kitchen Aid Ice Cream Attachment which we used last summer many times to create sorbet.  This summer, we are going to publish several of the recipes we’ve been using.  Most of the recipes we found in the Kitchen Aid book, which came with the Ice Cream Attachment.  However, the Strawberry Rhubarb recipe came from an LA Times blog post.

The recipe they posted:

Total time: 20 minutes, plus freezing time

Servings: Makes 1 1/2 quarts

Note: Adapted from David Lebovitz’s “The Perfect Scoop.” If your rhubarb stalks are more than an inch wide, slice them in half lengthwise.

3/4 pound rhubarb (5 or 6 thin stalks), trimmed

3/4 cup sugar

10 ounces fresh strawberries (about 1 1/2 cups)

1/2 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

1. Cut the rhubarb into half-inch pieces. In a medium, nonreactive saucepan, bring the rhubarb, two-thirds cup water and the sugar to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer until the rhubarb is tender and cooked through, about 5 minutes. Cool to room temperature.

2. Slice the strawberries and purée them in a blender or food processor with the cooked rhubarb mixture and lemon juice until smooth.

3. Chill the mixture thoroughly, then freeze in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Credit:Recipe from http://www.latimes.com/features/la-fo-calcookrec9aapr09,0,3067664.story

For the two photographs, first is the shot of the sorbet itself.

This shot was taken with a Canon t1i, 50mm 1.4f lens, and a Canon 580 EXii speedlite.  The shot was edited in Lightroom 3.0.  The shot was taken at ISO 200, f2.2, at 1/200th of a second.  The flash has a Gary Fong Collapsable Lightsphere diffuser on it. I was also using a reflector and direct overhead light.

This photo shows the setup:

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I should just mention that the sorbet is wonderful & was clearly starting to melt as I took both shots (it’s warm outside, which makes the sorbet that much better).