Tag Archives: Vegetarian Recipe

Cabbage

Our local farmers have been bringing cabbage to market for a few weeks now.  I generally think of cabbage as a filler or as something in sauerkraut.  However, this week I found a recipe in Madhur Jaffrey’s World Vegetarian that made me do a double take!

photo (8)First off, a bit about cabbage!  According to wikipedia, cabbage is related to broccoli, cauliflower, and brussel sprouts.  Cabbage heads range from 1-8 pounds.  Typically the ones we’ve been seeing at our local market are in the smaller 1-3 pound size.  As you can see in the photo, they come in a variety of colors and have different appearances.

Recipes:

As usual, I asked around on facebook and twitter for recipe ideas.  Most of the suggestions this week came in via facebook.

Pat MacPherson:  sauteed cabbage with dill and caraway. and butter!

Lindsay Iversen Martha knows:http://www.marthastewart.com/939039/braised-red-cabbage

Martha Ware Peaceful Meadow Retreat’s Probiotic Cultured Veggies:http://www.peacefulmeadow.com/resources/recipes/making-cultured-vegetables/

All look interesting!

1002758_10101410101277558_1277705907_nWe made a really interesting dish earlier this week that we recommend for sure!  As I mentioned earlier from the Madhur Jaffrey’s World Vegetarian cookbook, she has a Cabbage with Rice and Currants – Tembel Dolma – from Turkey.  This dish was really interesting.  I found another blogger posted the recipe here.  The dish was really interesting!  The spice base was dill and cinnamon, which is a combination I had never heard of (or even thought about).  The house smelled amazing and the dish was great!  It also stayed fresh very well in the fridge for leftovers & was even more delicious paired with a split bean dal.  Strongly recommended.

Anyhow, those are some notes about cabbage.  Sorry, no family secret sauerkraut recipe, although I’d love one! I’ve actually never made it – even though I am a huge fan.

How do you enjoy cabbage? 

Summer Squash

This week we are talking about summer squash!  I figure mid-July is late enough in the year to examine this fruit – that is often treated as a vegetable!

First off, there are many many different items that are loosely classified as ‘summer squash.’  There are zucchini, yellow squash, pattypan squash, tromboncino….  The list goes on & on!  For the most part, all of them can be used the same way & are part of the Cucurbita pepo family.  (Thank you Wikipedia!)

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Photos of some small summer squash we found while in Montreal last week visiting the Jean-Talon Marche.

photo 1Our local farmers are all selling various summer squash now.  We got some amazing zucchini and yellow squash from River to River Farm this week at the Canon Park Market.  They were also selling patty squash.

Interestingly enough, (thanks Wikipedia again) summer squash are really just under-ripe winter squash varieties.  These particular varieties typically have softer outer ‘skins’ which can typically be eaten raw or cooked.

Cooking ideas:
As usual, I reached out on Facebook and Twitter for ideas about how to cook this week’s item.  I received a great idea from @TinaTormey this week:

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Sautéed:
This is a favorite method of ours.  Wash your squash, cut off the ends (typically a stem is on one end), then slice the squash into bite sized pieces.  We often slice them into ‘half moons’ (usually with zucchini or yellow squash) – to do this, take the squash, cut it lengthwise to end up with two long pieces, then slice the squash up the length of the fruit.  You end up with little pieces looking like half moons.

From there, put some olive oil in a warm skillet, let the oil warm up, and toss the squash in!  Let them heat up some – you will notice them starting to sweat a bit and change size/color a bit.

To spice this up, add some garlic (before you cook them) or really any spices you like.

Grilled:
1044203_10101401048878638_836205514_nI feel like we grill a lot of vegetables!  But, summer squash grills really well too!  On Tuesday, at our weekly grill-out, we grilled up some zucchini.  We had cut them long wise, marinated them in olive oil and salt/pepper.  As a reminder, grilled zucchini (especially cut thicker like I sometimes do) takes a lot longer to grill than you might expect, and if they’re in strips they can slip between the bars on the grill.

In this photo you see the zucchini, some red peppers, and some local beef sausages from Josh at Lick Creek Beef.

Steamed:
Prepare the same way you did the sautéed squash & steam instead!

We also put squash in a wide variety of dishes.  Today, we put some zucchini in a recipe of Dal that we had for lunch.  It was dal-icious!

How do you like your summer squash? What recipes do you put it in?

The flowering top of a cabbage: aka Broccoli!

Yes, in Italian, the word broccolo refers to the flowering top of a cabbage… or so wikipedia tells me.

A few weeks ago we were delighted to hear from our farmer friends at River to River photo (7)Farm that they would have broccoli!  I love broccoli.  There was a time in my life where I ate rice and broccoli doused in soy sauce for most meals.

In this post, I’m going to talk about broccoli and then share three simple ways to prepare broccoli.

But first, some information about this wonderful vegetable.  Yes, it is a vegetable.  Broccoli is high in vitamin C and dietary fiber.  Broccoli has some amazing anti-cancer compound in it.  However, if you boil the broccoli, the power of the anti-cancer compound is reduced (thank you wikipedia…).

You can eat the whole thing.  The stem, the leaves, and the large flower-like head. I typically find the stalk to be pretty tough, but when sliced, it can be quite delicious, too (you can also peel the stalk if you prefer).

Generally I like my broccoli lightly steamed.  I take a fork and fork the broccoli before I start cooking it to see how tough it is – then steam it for a few minutes.  I’ll fork it again and when my fork easily goes in – then I know it is ready (or just past ready usually…).

Three more recipe ideas:

Roasted Broccoli
Rinse the broccoli, cut it into bigger than bite sized pieces, place the broccoli on a roasting pan with olive oil, garlic, and herbs (I like rosemary) – then roast it in the oven for 20-30 min.  You should have a pretty well done broccoli head by then.  I would typically roast it with many other vegetables – but, just broccoli works too!

Raw Broccoli
Wash, cut up into bite sized pieces and eat.  Many folks like to dip their broccoli in various dipping sauces.  I personally love having fresh hummus with mine.  You can also cut the stalk into matchstick sized slivers & make a broccoli coleslaw.

Sautéed Broccoli
Wash, cut to bite sized pieces and add to any stir-fry you are doing.  Broccoli will want to cook less than a carrot but longer than a bell pepper.  Typically for a nice big stir-fry, I would start with oil in a pan, add garlic and onion.  Let that go till the onion is translucent.  Then I’d add any root vegetables (carrots, turnips, parsnips…).  Let that go for a bit.  Now is time for ginger if you are fan – chopped.  If you plan on adding a protein now is the time (tofu, turkey chunks, chicken chunks…).  Add the ‘medium’ vegetables like broccoli.  Add any lighter vegetables like snow peas, peppers, green beans….  From there – I might also add some greens like spinach, kale, or swiss chard.  Finally, I’d add some sort of sauce.  Usually a simple soy/tamari works –  you can spice it up with hot sauce or asian hot sauces.  Serve over a bed of rice.

So, that’s some on the broccoli!  Who knew it was part of the cabbage family! (other than my smarter half… o well.  It is also related to other brassicas such as brussel sprouts.).

How do you like your broccoli? 

Simple Vegetable Soup [Recipe + Photos]

This is a pretty simple root vegetable soup recipe.  My partner is feeling a bit under the weather, so I put together a simple soup.  We already had some turkey stock in the freezer which I used.  However, you could easily make a stock using bouillon or make a miso based soup.  We really like this brand “Better Than Bouillon” – but really anything from the store will do.

So, for today’s soup – part of it is just to see what vegetables you have laying around!  I found a carrot, parsnip, small potato, onion, and later added a zucchini at her request.

Start by washing & chopping vegetables.

The potato needs the most time in the pot to be tender.  The zucchini needs the least amount of time.  You can really add the garlic whenever you want.  If you add it sooner, everything gets a nice garlic taste.  If you add it later the garlic taste is much power powerful.  Because my partner is a bit under the weather, I wanted to make sure there was plenty of garlic, but that it wasn’t too potent.

Chopped onions:

Garlic right before it was cleaned, sliced and put in the pot.  We opted for sliced over mashed – just personal preference – both are great.  As you can tell, we really like a lot of garlic.

I ended up letting the onions & garlic cook for a bit (with some olive oil) before I added the potato.  But, here’s a photo of all of them in the pot.  You’ll notice the larger garlic slices.

While they were cooking, I cut up the carrot & parsnip.

Put all of that in the pot & let it cook while I cut the zucchini.

Then I added the stock – our stock was still partially frozen.  The photo I got of it just looks ugly – but here it is.

Bring it all up to a simmer – then test to see if the various vegetables are cooked.  Our broth was already well seasoned, so I didn’t add any salt/pepper…etc – but you could/should.

After I thought it was done, my partner ended up adding beet greens, fresh basil, dried thyme, and wax beans.  I love the color that the beet greens add.  So, here’s a photo of that:

That’s it! A simple vegetable soup.